Tag: UFC Photographer

I would like to see the straps be inches longer with the ability to cinch up some slack. The Smashes on Saturday. He comes forward, stays in the pocket, and has a really good chin. Posts navigation

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Get to grips with the changes

Sparring will increase your fitness like nothing else, but it can also dangerously wear you out, so use it wisely. The idea is to start leaping through the rankings and get yourself the championship match of your dreams.

So learning to defend against them should always play a part in your training — especially if your opponent has a higher Grapple stat than you. Make sure you pick a wrestling or jiu jitsu-focused camp, and use training routines from the Train sub-menu to increase that stat. Quick Shoots and Wrestling Class are perfect for this, so focus on them as well as using Learn with a grapple-focused training partner.

When it comes to fighting from a vertical base, knowing the right combinations of strikes as well as where and when to use them is everything.

Each UFC fighter will have a set of boxing, kickboxing or Muay Thai strikes and each one can be strung together. Here is a slideshow of shots from the workouts. All fighters made weigh on their first try and there were no big surprises. Below is the slideshow of images from the weigh in. I was recently turned on to CarrySpeed straps by a recommendation from photographer Gary Fong.

For several years, I have religiously used BlackRapid straps for all my assignments, and for the most part, have been happy with their performance. Sure, there have been some nuances here and there, but overall they served their purpose. I turned a number of people on to BlackRapid, though I had no agreement or compensation to do so.

I just liked their stuff. I thought before buying more straps from BlackRapid, I would see what else is on the market before investing more money in gear. I will make the same declaration here before I start getting into the meat of the review. CarrySpeed has not compensated me in any way, and I have no agreement or deal with them.

I bought these straps with my own cash to try out, and I feel obligated to give an honest review. I also purchased a handful of various mounting plates and adapters for all my different bodies and lenses. The customer service from the start was quite pleasant. I placed my order on a Wednesday before my trip to China. I was very surprised when they arrived the next day.

I unpacked everything right away and familiarized myself with all the pieces and assembly. CarrySpeed pays close attention to the small details. The straps were packed neatly, with all pieces wrapped and labeled individually; along with a complete and detailed instruction set for assembly and operation.

Frankly, I was too excited to get them out and use them. Setup took just a minute or two, and then I was able to attach the cameras and begin adjusting the straps. The construction is very high quality. They are very comfortable on the shoulders, especially the double strap. There is quite a bit more padding than other straps on the market, and they are very beefy and secure. Additionally, the FS-Pro has a non-slip material on the underside of the strap that really does a good job of keeping the strap in place.

In fact, on all my BlackRapid straps, I gaff taped all the strap locks to stop them from coming undone. There is no fear of that on the CarrySpeed straps. Their locks are much stronger and stay put when you lock them. They hold so well that they take quite a bit of force to get them unlocked if you need to move them.

All the straps have double stitching, and the quick release buckles have an extra locking mechanism as a failsafe for the straps. The fact that the straps are detachable is a wonderful feature in itself, and the extra locking mechanisms to prevent them from accidentally becoming unhooked are a great extra bonus.

Installation of the various ballhead attachment points is straightforward and easy. I elected to install the offset folding camera plate on the bottom of both my Canon 1Dx bodies, and the standard offset plate on the bottom of my mm lens. The folding post is a brilliant feature. I really love the flexibility of that plate, and I like the creative thinking of the designers who came up with the idea.

A big advantage CarrySpeed offers over many of the other strap makers in this class is the offset mounting points on the plates. For others who use a tripod more often, this will be a welcome feature to improve efficiency. The camera plates do present one challenge for me, though. Luckily, I was able to adjust the dividers a bit and flip the camera position to fit comfortably, and thus far it has worked just fine.

One note on the installation of the folding offset plate. At first, it might seem like the proper way to install the folding plate is with the ball joint folding towards the back of the camera body. This is not correct though and will create some issues for you if you try it. I wanted to try it both ways and see what was more comfortable.

Just point it forward like the photos illustrate in the instructions and on their website. Now, the folding plate is a bit bulky and is a little awkward to hold when shooting vertically.

Not a huge issue for me, it just takes a little getting used to. I have big hands, so perhaps it could be more of an issue for people with smaller hands. The Ball joint locking mechanism itself is very secure and I feel much more comfortable letting the camera drop during a quick change.

However, the ball joint presents a few challenges — 1 there is not a lot of side-to-side play in the ball joint, which is good because it prevents the metal pieces from contacting the camera or lens and scratching them, but it also is a bit awkward feeling at first.

After a few hours, I was able to get it down pretty good. The two straps come with an additional support strap for telephoto lenses. My only real complaint about the straps is the length. Being tall, my biggest complaint with all camera straps of this style has been that they are not long enough to hold the cameras at a comfortable position on my hips. I would like to see the straps be inches longer with the ability to cinch up some slack.

This is more an issue with the single strap, but would also be nice to have the length a little longer on the double straps, as well. Perhaps maybe an option to have custom straps made would be a possibility, or even just an extra strap spacer that could be clipped into the triple-locking release buckles.

I would gladly pay a few bucks extra for this. All in all, I am very happy with the CarrySpeed straps and would gladly recommend them to anyone in the market for this type of strap.

I will be keeping my eye on them for future products, enhancements, and improvements; and I will definitely be purchasing more equipment from them. For more information on CarrySpeed straps, check out their website at www. I sit here on another overnight plane, headed to the east coast. I got comfortable tucked into my window seat with my laptop and a pile of TV shows to get caught up on.

The flight surprisingly went by quick, even though I slept very little. Once on the ground in Hong Kong, I met my greeter and was whisked away to immigration and baggage claim. Before I knew it, I was in the back of a very nice Mercedes on the way to my hotel. I checked in at the Marco Polo Hotel in Kowloon and ordered room service before crashing.

Tuesday morning, I had a meeting at the Harbour City Mall, which conveniently was attached to the hotel. I headed over an hour early and walked around the mall, hoping to find some good deals. Sadly though, it was full of stores much higher end than my budget or preferences called for. We took a look at the space where the press conference and workouts would be held on Wednesday. It was a nice open area near the sports stores.

It was originally designed to be a basketball court for kids to play on, so it was quite spacious. After the meetings, I got my first experience on the TurboJet ferry across to Macau.

With some help of my co-workers, I made it just fine. The ferry trip is about an hour across the South China Sea to Macau. I checked in at the Venetian and drug all my gear upstairs. Venetian is known for being an all suites hotel, and they are true suites, not just the holiday inn style.

Up and at it the next morning, I was headed back on the ferry to Honk Kong for the press conference and open workouts. The idea of doing them on the same day, in the same location, was brilliant. There was a solid turnout of media in attendance, though the press conference only lasted about minutes. There were a number of photo ops with and without the girls after the press conference concluded.

This was just a normal open workout, with the added bonus of Urijah Faber providing commentary and explaining techniques to the media. Only Rich Franklin and Cung Le worked out, and only for about 10 minutes apiece.

After that, there were some more photo ops. The day rounded out with Urijah Faber and Chuck Liddell teaching a couple techniques to some kids from a local outreach program in Hong Kong.

After that crazy long day, we boarded the ferry back to Macao. I was able to get all my edits done on the boat in transit and uploaded everything quickly when I returned to my room. Thursday was now a much easier day, having done both the press conference and open workouts already. I only had to shoot portraits of 4 fighters, and then do some more editing. His speed strap system is the easiest and most portable light modification system I have ever used. Check out their full range of gear at HonlPhoto.

The fighters all showed up right on time, and for the most part were very cooperative. I noticed that Hyun Gyu Lim was a little less attentive than the other guys and he was refusing to remove his sunglasses for the photos. After finally convincing him to remove the glasses, I noticed his eyes were a little more sunk in that usual. He definitely looked to be struggling with the weight cut. I had visions of the last time I shot Anthony Johnson, when he came in 6 pounds overweight. But, we still had 32 hours until the weigh in, so I was confident Lim would make the weight.

I was met with a surprise the next morning when I woke to find the Lim v Mitchell fight had been cancelled after Lim apparently passed out in the sauna cutting weight and had to be sent to the hospital. The weigh ins were scheduled for 6pm, two hours later than normal. I headed down to the arena around 4: The setup rarely changes for a UFC weigh in, so I typically end up shooting from the same spot every time. I just have to make sure I get there relatively early before anyone else steals my prime real estate.

Aside from two guys having to strip down butt naked and weigh in behind the towel, the event went off without a hitch. Everyone was on weight, despite several fighters complaining about the jet lag from the long travel and time difference from America. I think most agreed though that it was worth the extra bit of suffering to go through this experience. Fight day finally arrived, and I was anxious for it to begin. I had been having trouble sleeping off and on all week, but on fight day I awoke just after 3: I ended up arriving at the arena around 5: Unfortunately, the communications department took quite a while to run my internet line and I was left twiddling my thumbs for quite a while.

I sat through rehearsals a few times and watched as some of the fighters started showing up to warm up inside the Octagon. It was finally time for the first bout, and that opening scrap was a fun one. Riki Fukuda battled Tom DeBlass to a decision victory. DeBlass looked much better at middleweight and gave Fukuda all he could handle; though it was pretty clear Fukuda did enough to get the nod. The crowd was filling up quickly and was very enthused.

The flyweight bout between John Lineker and Yasuhiro Urushitani was a barn burner. Lineker had Urushitani hurt a few different times throughout the bout, but could not put him away. Both guys are very fun to watch and this was one I thought would contend for fight of the night. Lineker took a unanimous decision victory. The first preliminary fight started about 8: With eleven fights on the card, it was shaping up to be a long night. The arena was more than half full for the first fight and the fans erupted when their countryman, Francisco Trinaldo, finished C.

Keith with an arm triangle choke. Finally, at nearly 1: Michael Bisping walked out first to a strong chorus of boos. His opponent, Vitor Belfort was met with a nice reaction from the crowd, though nothing like Sarafian experienced. Vitor looked fired up and ready to destroy. And destroy he did. Belfort controlled the action in round one, landing a number of significant kicks and punches.

Belfort followed up with a series of hammer-fists forcing referee Dan Miragliotta to stop the fight. The crowd went nuts, as did Vitor. After completing my edit and packing everything up, I was en route back to the hotel by 3: My alarm rang bright and early at 9: I headed back to the arena to cover the elimination fights for TUF Brasil 2.

The next two days were also spent covering various aspects of the upcoming reality show, until I was finally in a car headed back to the airport about 5: I had just enough time to get to the hotel and take a shower before I was back in a car headed to the UFC Gym for the open workouts. I mean that literally as apparently they were still under construction the day before. I did a quick once-over and decided on locations to place a few speedlites.

The overhead florescent lights did not provide the look I was going for, so of course I came prepared with four of my Canon EX-RT units. And, for the next four hours, I clicked away as various fighters cycled through the gym to workout for media. The whole day was really a blur, but I actually came away with several shots I was happy with. After the workouts, I headed back to the hotel to work on my edit and finally had a chance to relax and take a look out the window.

It had just started snowing. It was then that I realized less than 36 hours before, I was wearing shorts and flip-flops. The usual press conference followed on Thursday, and today saw us head back to the Chicago Theatre once again for another weigh-in. I love it when we do weigh-ins inside these old historic theatres.

They create such a cool atmosphere and make for really nice wide photos. He appeared to apologize to the commission official and UFC coordinator Burt Watson, and you could see Watson was visibly upset as he stepped back while Rampage hopped on the scale. But then the weight was announced as pounds. After making weight, Rampage proceeded to get in the face of his opponent, Glover Teixeira, and give him a tongue-lashing as they faced off.

Tomorrow is yet another early call to head over for a long day at the arena. But, until then, I leave you with a few slideshows from the last couple weeks. UFC on FX 7: Belfort v Bisping — Images by Joshua Hedges.

I write to you today from sunny, beautiful Australia. The Smashes on Saturday. I covered the fights alongside longtime Getty staff photographer Ezra Shaw.

Henderson v Diaz — Images by Joshua Hedges. My itinerary saw me layover in San Francisco for about 5 hours, followed by a hour flight to Auckland, New Zealand and another 3 hour layover there. I finally arrived in Gold Coast mid-morning Tuesday. Upon arriving at the hotel in Surfers Paradise, I was presented with some of the best working conditions a man could ask for.

On Wednesday, I spent the day shooting portraits of various fighters on the card. Nothing too exciting, though it was nice to see all the guys again who I worked with at the beginning of filming for TUF: Everyone is in great shape and excited to put on a great fight.

Thursday saw us drive out to Boonchu Muay Thai for the open workouts. The gym is owned by legendary Aussie fighter John Wayne Parr. It was a pleasant surprise when the man himself greeted us upon arrival and welcomed us into his gym.

Some only shadow boxing, others a little more intense. Here is a slideshow of shots from the workouts. All fighters made weigh on their first try and there were no big surprises. Below is the slideshow of images from the weigh in. I was recently turned on to CarrySpeed straps by a recommendation from photographer Gary Fong. For several years, I have religiously used BlackRapid straps for all my assignments, and for the most part, have been happy with their performance.

Sure, there have been some nuances here and there, but overall they served their purpose. I turned a number of people on to BlackRapid, though I had no agreement or compensation to do so. I just liked their stuff. I thought before buying more straps from BlackRapid, I would see what else is on the market before investing more money in gear.

I will make the same declaration here before I start getting into the meat of the review. CarrySpeed has not compensated me in any way, and I have no agreement or deal with them. I bought these straps with my own cash to try out, and I feel obligated to give an honest review. I also purchased a handful of various mounting plates and adapters for all my different bodies and lenses.

The customer service from the start was quite pleasant. I placed my order on a Wednesday before my trip to China. I was very surprised when they arrived the next day. I unpacked everything right away and familiarized myself with all the pieces and assembly. CarrySpeed pays close attention to the small details. The straps were packed neatly, with all pieces wrapped and labeled individually; along with a complete and detailed instruction set for assembly and operation.

Frankly, I was too excited to get them out and use them. Setup took just a minute or two, and then I was able to attach the cameras and begin adjusting the straps.

The construction is very high quality. They are very comfortable on the shoulders, especially the double strap. There is quite a bit more padding than other straps on the market, and they are very beefy and secure. Additionally, the FS-Pro has a non-slip material on the underside of the strap that really does a good job of keeping the strap in place.

In fact, on all my BlackRapid straps, I gaff taped all the strap locks to stop them from coming undone. There is no fear of that on the CarrySpeed straps. Their locks are much stronger and stay put when you lock them. They hold so well that they take quite a bit of force to get them unlocked if you need to move them. All the straps have double stitching, and the quick release buckles have an extra locking mechanism as a failsafe for the straps.

The fact that the straps are detachable is a wonderful feature in itself, and the extra locking mechanisms to prevent them from accidentally becoming unhooked are a great extra bonus.

Installation of the various ballhead attachment points is straightforward and easy. I elected to install the offset folding camera plate on the bottom of both my Canon 1Dx bodies, and the standard offset plate on the bottom of my mm lens. The folding post is a brilliant feature. I really love the flexibility of that plate, and I like the creative thinking of the designers who came up with the idea.

A big advantage CarrySpeed offers over many of the other strap makers in this class is the offset mounting points on the plates. For others who use a tripod more often, this will be a welcome feature to improve efficiency.

The camera plates do present one challenge for me, though. Luckily, I was able to adjust the dividers a bit and flip the camera position to fit comfortably, and thus far it has worked just fine. One note on the installation of the folding offset plate. At first, it might seem like the proper way to install the folding plate is with the ball joint folding towards the back of the camera body.

This is not correct though and will create some issues for you if you try it. I wanted to try it both ways and see what was more comfortable. Just point it forward like the photos illustrate in the instructions and on their website.